Archive | January, 2015

So True

30 Jan

Eleanor Roosevelt: Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway.

Gender Differences

25 Jan

The most recent issue of the American Psychologist included an article that reported a large-scale study about gender differences. Zell, Krizan, and Teeter (2015) analyzed other studies with an aggregate total of over 12 million subjects from different age groups, cultures, and generations.

The largest differences suggested that males scored higher on masculinity, the spatial ability to mentally rotate, the importance of physical attractiveness in choosing a mate, and aggression. Females scored higher on reactivity to painful stimuli, attachment to peers, and interest in people rather than things.

Although there were some differences, they were, across the domains, relatively small. Even the larger differences were small enough to provide considerable support for a gender similarities hypothesis. Yet the authors acknowledge that even small differences can have important impacts on everyday life. (Zell, E., Krizan, Z., & Teeter, S. R.. 2015. Evaluating gender similarities and differences using metasynthesis. American Psychologist, 70(1), 10-20.

Point of View

22 Jan

Simon Schama: Irreverence is the lifeblood of freedom.

Happiness

18 Jan

Happiness is not always the most desirable mood. People who are feeling mildly unhappy are better at tasks that need detailed, systematic, and critical thinking. (Kashdan, T., & Biswas-Diener, R. The downside of happiness. Psychotherapy Networker, 2014, 38 (5), 38-45.)

Wisdom

16 Jan

Desiderata: If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Overprotection of Children

11 Jan

The author of the article in the Psychotherapy Networker (2014, 38(5), 26-31 & 48.), Dr. M. Ungar, asserts that overprotective parenting is now the norm and that it does real psychological harm to children’s development. Children who are overprotected tend to be anxious and to have low self-confidence in their abilities to cope with the unfamiliar. Dr. Ungar advocates developmentally appropriate adventurous play and progressively larger responsibilities as the remedies.

Depression

9 Jan

Research results are equivocal for the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of depression.  (Rodriguez, T, & Stern, V. Acupuncture for depression. Scientific American Mind, 2014, 25(4), 12.)