Archive | June, 2017

Wisdom

29 Jun

Novelist Edna Buchanan: Friends are the family we choose for ourselves. http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Advertisements

Wellbeing

25 Jun

After questioning over 8,000 over 51 year old adults, researchers concluded that five life skills boosted the wellbeing of older adults: optimism, conscientiousness, emotional stability, control, and determination. All five were equal contributors. (Mind, Mood, and Memory, 2017, 13(7), p.1) http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Suicide Myth

18 Jun

Contrary to the popular belief that suicide spikes at Christmas, suicide rates in December and on Christmas specifically are the lowest in the year. However, rates do spike on New Years Day, peak in springtime, especially during the week after Easter, and are higher on Mondays and Tuesdays. (Rodriguez, T. The Christmas time suicide myth. Scientific American Mind, 2016, 27(6), p. 9) http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Wisdom

16 Jun

Voltaire: Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Wit

11 Jun

Alexander Hamilton: A well-adjusted person is one who makes the same mistake twice without getting nervous. http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Nostalgia

8 Jun

Nostalgia for the the past is good for you. It promotes self-continuity through increasing feeling of social connection and also brings feelings of vitality. (Hutson, M. Embrace the nostalgia. Scientific American Mind, 2016, 27(6), 8-9) http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com

Novel Comments

4 Jun

I have finished the first novel, My Brilliant Friend (2012), of Elena Ferrante’s Neopolitan Novels. It depicts the friendship between two extraordinarily talented, intelligent girls from ages 6 to 16 as they grow up in a working class Italian neighborhood. In Ferrante’s sharp, insightful prose the depth and intensity of their relationship is revealed in its full complexity as they repeatedly join together and pull apart in their imitations, envies, and love of each other. Whether they collaborate or compete, no matter what is going on, each is always aware of the other. http://www.finebergpsychotherapy.com